An area of the forum dedicated to the other marques and models sat on your driveway (please post only one thread per car)
#159545 by cavalier1990
Sun Oct 02, 2016 12:04 am
Thought I'd post this one up as I am doing a bit of work on it just now and have quite a few pics.

Well here's what happened late last year -the Engine cooked due to water pump impeller shearing in 3 bits while I was coming home. Luckily engine block and head on straight six is cast iron so less worries about warping - hopefully!.

I firstly suspected head gasket and tested with block tester because there was oodles of pressure building up really quickly in the system, which confirmed the problem. However on inspection the gasket rings look ok with no blow by. Hopefully the head hasn't warped when it was heating up and letting gas into the coolant.

Add in to that that I was rebuilding my cavy that I wanted to get on the road before anything else so this just lay until I had time to get to it. I stripped head and water pump off, and while this is off I decided to fix some of the rust around the chassis leg and lower crossmember as well while the head and manifold is out of the way.

Today I was cutting out any rot and treating any rust I found around this area. All being said it was pretty bad but I expected this anyway as had more or less neglected it for quite a while before decided to get to it.

Anyhoo, here's some pics to feast on just now. This 3.0 model has the goldseal engine, which is the big valve heads they put in for the cats, and I put straight through pipes where the cats were as it's age is actually before the cats are required for law. It goes like stink :):

Picture before I took water pump out but had removed viscous fan
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This engine is Cam in Head and has double timing chains driving the cam sprocket. You actually have to lift the head up and over the camshaft sprocket as there is a support plate below it. Believe me when I say the head weighs probably about the same as a small 1.0 liter engine. I had to put blocks of wood under it and progressively lift it up to clear the timing chains, then "pole vault" it up on it's end with a big block of wood on the battery tray acting as a support for one end of the head, then bear hug it to lift it out.
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The pupm impeller in 3 bits.
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Cylinder head after cleaning and valve bedding in with grinding paste
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This is looking straight down sort of where the power steering pump and the inner chassis leg would be - literally! About half of the top of it I cut off due to rust, so what you can see is actually the bottom half of the chassis leg where the subframe bolts on to.

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#159553 by Robsey
Sun Oct 02, 2016 11:03 am
Excellent work so far...
I presume you have managed to get all the impeller blades out and accounted for.

Would be a major head ache for a blade to surface inside the engine after the rebuild.

Nice to see work on one of the older 'battle barges'.
I believe the straight sixes are bomb proof (within realistic expectations).

You do love your car de-rusting projects don't you. :)
#159556 by Mk3alan
Sun Oct 02, 2016 6:23 pm
Good work, those big old Vauxhall are great.
Didn't production of these continue purely for Police use?

Alan
#159559 by cavalier1990
Sun Oct 02, 2016 7:54 pm
Robsey wrote:Excellent work so far...
I presume you have managed to get all the impeller blades out and accounted for.

Would be a major head ache for a blade to surface inside the engine after the rebuild.

Nice to see work on one of the older 'battle barges'.
I believe the straight sixes are bomb proof (within realistic expectations).

You do love your car de-rusting projects don't you. :)


Yes Robsey, and it goes with the territory living in Rainy Kilt-land!

luckily the 3 broken impeller bits click together without any "ominously" missing bits! Think it is aftermarket pump as the impeller is plastic (Super glue anyone?) but got OE replacement one that has metal blades.

I think they are pretty much bomb proof considering the amount of tanking I gave it with pretty much no attention. I think it would have been ok if it wasn't for that pump! Maybe a good thing in a way as it means I get to fix the rust and hopefully make the engine a slightly bit nippier!

Cheers

Andrew
#159560 by cavalier1990
Sun Oct 02, 2016 7:57 pm
Mk3alan wrote:Good work, those big old Vauxhall are great.
Didn't production of these continue purely for Police use?

Alan


They are Alan but as usual with any VX bodywork longevity is piss poor. However give it it's dues it is 25 years old!

Not sure if the production run was continued for police Alan but I know the theyused a lot of them. Salivating at the thought of 24V manual police spec now :D

Cheers

Andrew
#160409 by cavalier1990
Thu Dec 01, 2016 10:54 pm
Had to remove front crossmember due to rust. Decided it just wasn't worth fixing each corner. It also meant I could get in and fix N/S lower of the chassis leg. Then I can hopefully garner a new one and replace it.

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#160452 by cavalier1990
Mon Dec 05, 2016 11:56 pm
James McGrath wrote:Good work. :thumb

Do you have any pictures of the whole car by the way?


Not yet James....I will try and get some soon though.
#162032 by cavalier1990
Mon Apr 03, 2017 9:47 pm
Wee update on my senny. Copied from ABS board.

Since my past report not much had been done to the car due to weather and being bone idle over the winter. Now that we have what looks like some sort of better weather and I am off on holidays I decided to get stuck in. I managed to locate a GM crossmember, according to parts guy it was last one available. This was rubbed down and painted with zinc primer then painted with top coat to protect from rusting again.

The front section where the crossmember sits was still messy and needy a bit of a tidy up to accommodate the part easily, plus some other work was required around there inc. a little bit more welding and prep before welding this on.

Then my welder started to play funny buggars, not feeding wire out very well. I think the little feed wheel is maybe worn, or the wire was maybe a bit dirty from storage. Anyway, managed to get it going just enough to get a weld. The crossmember is now on, sealed up and sprayed the welds with zinc primer to stop any corrosion until painted with top coat.

N/S of Crossmember
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OS Crossmember
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Full view pic. I can stand on it and jump up and down and it stays on so thumbs up!
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Onto the next bit of work. The inlet manifold was looking decidedly sorry for itself, so I got the electric wire brush out and gave it a good clean up. I also down the exhaust manifolds and the stat housing, which incidentally is looking rather porous around the pipe sleeves. Will be seeking a new one in due course I think.

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Dirty manifold
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Clean manifold
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Clean manifold again
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And final piece of work was to get the head back on. Had to give it a bit of a clean up on the face as a little bit of rust was starting from storage. Next step was to fashion up a lifting support from a nice rope I had. I utilised the holes at either end of the head to loop rope through and create a cradle with the rope. Then me and 2 others lifted it into place. Once in engine bay it went on ok apart from the back hose for the heater got caught between head and bulkhead.

Once this was done the head was still sitting slightly atop the dowels so I moved it around a few mls and clunk, in it went. I remembered to replace the little seal right at the front left of the block. Whatever is this for as both holes are blanked off?

I don't have the cam pulley on yet, do that tomorrow. The final bit for tonight was to run in the new head bolts. The right hand 3rd from the back bolt would not catch, despite all others going in easily enough. Obviously at this point I could feel my stomach sink like the titanic! I did think the right hand bolts were a bit tighter so I decided to tap the head to the right a bit with a rubber mallet and also tap the head bolt down, thinking that maybe a bit of the gasket was catching it. After that it went in ok - phew don't want to take that head back off again!

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#162033 by cavalier1990
Mon Apr 03, 2017 9:51 pm
This was not the end of the story however, when fixing the head bolts down this happened:

I've put the head back on, everything seemed ok until I got to putting cam sprocket back on. I put cam back on to the little locating dimple, using 2 screwdrivers in 2 bottom bolt holes to lift it up, then put on top cam bolt, removed screwdrivers from bottom bolt holes and then put in the other two bolts and tightened it.

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Now the cam won't budge and the engine is locked. I don't remember any spacers or anything behind the cam sprocket, but this isn't right. When you look down the back of the sprocket it is flat against the casting. Engine moved freely when cam sprocket wasn't on. The bottom of the engine still does move slightly but when it hits the chain tension it can't move the cam.

Then this happened:

I had another look at this and tried again to turn it, this time it moved but was very stiff and then loose, then jam again. I could turn it back easier than forward and at a certain point it would jam. I could hear a click from the cam area thinking maybe a sticky tappet or something so loosened all the followers right off. While I was doing that I had a look down the hole where the head bolt goes and spotted the problem. Somehow the bolts on the N/S of the engine, the short ones, have jammed against the side of the cam, causing the cam to rub on the bolts. I ran the bolts in but never tightened then all fully yet. Lucky I didn't.

If you look closely the cam has a ring round it where the bolt has been rubbing. They all have this freshly scraped ring at the bolt area:
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So that was the outcome of that! I am phased why the bolts wouldn't go right down, it was the shorter bolts I was using, they were same as old ones etc. Then Derek from GM6 got back to me with this:

undo the cam sprocket. Turn the cam around until the dowel is at 12 o'clock. The rebates in the cam will then allow you to do up the cylinder head bolts. Then make sure the crankshaft is at TDC (the keyway for the pulley will be at 12 o'clock and any timing marks on the flywheel will line up (visible through hole in back of engine block flange). Slacken off the chain tensioner on r side of timing casing. Then you can assemble the chain and sprocket. All this is detailed in any Haynes manual for any car with the CIH engine

Basically there are grooves cut out of the cam that allow the bolts to slide past the cam but top sprocket key has to be at 12 o clock, not 6 o clock like mine. Result - struggle to get bolts right into their housing. I now know why the old ones were a bit sticky to come out!
#162037 by Robsey
Tue Apr 04, 2017 12:05 am
What a pain...
Hopefully you have only polished the cams with the bolt incursions, and not scored into them.

I haven't worked on a Cam In Head engine since the early nineties.
My friend'sManta GTE 2.0 CIH was a nice car to work on. Those heads and blocks were stupid heavy though.

Had a unique noise when ticking over, I seem to recall.

Looks crazy seeing 12 rockers in a row...

Looking forward to the next episode...
#162200 by cavalier1990
Tue Apr 18, 2017 8:01 pm
Robsey wrote:What a pain...
Hopefully you have only polished the cams with the bolt incursions, and not scored into them.

I haven't worked on a Cam In Head engine since the early nineties.
My friend'sManta GTE 2.0 CIH was a nice car to work on. Those heads and blocks were stupid heavy though.

Had a unique noise when ticking over, I seem to recall.

Looks crazy seeing 12 rockers in a row...

Looking forward to the next episode...


Looks ok the cam only has slight scuff not ground in mark. Only first 2 and one at back were like this I had originally said all were scuffed.

Yes the head is insanely heavy on this one, especially with manifolds both still attached. I could just lift it with my own strength so it must be a good 6 stone or more. Basically the weight of a block, easily.

I think mantas were common for that tickover noise, more than likely as most of them had been rag dolled by boy racers!
#162201 by cavalier1990
Tue Apr 18, 2017 8:10 pm
James McGrath wrote:I always thought the CIH engines were a good and interesting design.

Nice midway point between ease of service and engine performance and unique to Vauxhall/Opel.


I do like the design myself, not that it is easier or harder to work on, just that it is unique to opel, and is well known for hardiness. VX had their own straight 6 overhead valve and was used in the old cresta although was no match for the opel straight 6.
#162884 by cavalier1990
Sun Jun 11, 2017 5:17 pm
Wee update to this. The engine is now running. I had to make up an engine oil shield to put round the cam cover as you have to adjust tappets with cam cover off. Very exciting stuff!

It seems to be running quite well and engine is very happy with it's new water pump and head recon and skim. In saying that there is quite a bit of patching up to the bodywork to be done before I put it anywhere near an MOT station. Not so much welding but just bits that look awful. Although in truth some bits like the wheelarches need totally renewed if I am honest.

Here it is running with my "devised from an old ikea clip together storage box" oil shield attached!

http://vid132.photobucket.com/albums/q1 ... mgkxe8.mp4

P.S. Something wrong with photobucket again, not displaying images/videos at the moment.
#162897 by Robsey
Mon Jun 12, 2017 12:37 am
Ooh I remember them old style rockers...
Love this retro stuff.

"It lives!!" :cool
#162904 by Mk3alan
Mon Jun 12, 2017 7:53 am
I remember one of our old Viva's had similar rockers and one of the push rods punched its way right through!
Had to weld it up that night to get to work next day.

Alan
#162940 by cavalier1990
Tue Jun 13, 2017 8:32 pm
Mk3alan wrote:I remember one of our old Viva's had similar rockers and one of the push rods punched its way right through!
Had to weld it up that night to get to work next day.

Alan


Definitely an old school repair there Alan, in the days when you could get a rocker cover off in a couple of minutes!

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